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Pine reproductive organs… more fruits merged into one… PineApples

First time a lot`s of times  I have enjoyed this fruit delight canned… Later on  it has shown up as raw fruit in supermarkets. But the strange looking fruit with pointy leaves and the high price keep me long time away from trying it. I think that first raw pineapple i enjoyed was at my host (Mircea L.)  few raw slices and also in a great looking cocktail made by him. It’s great taste and decorating value, cut or as not makes him a interesting fruit, cold sensitive and stored outside but for a short period of time… On some videos I have seen that before u cut it is recommended to lay him on the back so the sugars can run into the fruit… and chill him for 30 minutes in the fridge… all this time you can all lay back and relax with some you sweet baby and Brazilian lounge music… Read the fact’s 2…

Day 3: Pineapples… apeals me 2!

Pineapple (Ananas comosus) is the common name for an edible tropical plant and also its fruit . It is native to Paraguay and the southern part of Brazil. Pineapple is eaten fresh or canned and is available as a juice or in juice combinations. Sweet, it is known for its high acid content. Pineapples are the only bromeliad fruit in widespread cultivation.

Botany

The pineapple is a herbaceous perennial plant which grows to 1.0 to 1.5 metres tall with 30 or more trough-shaped and pointed leaves 30 to 100 centimetres long, surrounding a thick stem. The pineapple is an example of a multiple fruit: multiple, helically-arranged flowers along the axis each produce a fleshy fruit that becomes pressed against the fruits of adjacent flowers, forming what appears to be a single fleshy fruit.

The fruit of a pineapple are arranged in two interlocking helices, eight in one direction, thirteen in the other, each being a Fibonacci number.

Pollination

The natural (or most common) pollinator of the pineapple is the hummingbird. Pollination is required for seed formation; the presence of seeds negatively affects the quality of the fruit. In Hawaii, where pineapple is cultivated on an agricultural scale, importation of hummingbirds is prohibited for this reason.

Certain bat-pollinated wild pineapples, members of the bromeliad family, do the exact opposite of most flowers by opening their flowers at night and closing them during the day.

Cultivars

  • ‘Hilo’: A compact 1–1.5 kg  Hawaiian variant of ‘Smooth Cayenne’. The fruit is more cylindrical and produces many suckers but no slips.
  • ‘Kona Sugarloaf’: 2.5–3 kg, white flesh with no woodiness in the center. Cylindrical in shape, it has a high sugar content but no acid. An unusually sweet fruit.
  • ‘Natal Queen’: 1–1.5 kg, golden yellow flesh, crisp texture and delicate mild flavor. Well adapted to fresh consumption. Keeps well after ripening. Leaves spiny.
  • ‘Pernambuco’ (‘Eleuthera’): 1–2 kg with pale yellow to white flesh. Sweet, melting and excellent for eating fresh. Poorly adapted for shipping. Leaves spiny.
  • ‘Red Spanish’: 1–2 kg, pale yellow flesh with pleasant aroma; squarish in shape. Well adapted for shipping as fresh fruit to distant markets. Leaves spiny.
  • ‘Smooth Cayenne’: 2.5–3 kg, pale yellow to yellow flesh. Cylindrical in shape and with high sugar and acid content. Well adapted to canning and processing. Leaves without spines. This is the variety from Hawaii, and the most easily obtainable in U.S. grocery stores. Both 73-114 and 73-50 are of this cultivar.

Storage and transport

Fresh pineapple is often somewhat expensive as the tropical fruit is delicate and difficult to ship. Pineapples can ripen after harvest, but require certain temperatures for this process to occur. Like bananas, they are chill-sensitive and should not be stored in the refrigerator. They will, however, ripen if left outside of a refrigerator. The ripening of pineapples can be rather difficult as they will not ripen for some time and in a day or two become over-ripe, therefore, pineapples are most widely available canned.

Usage in culture

  • In some cultures, the pineapple has become associated with the notion of welcome, an association bespoken by the use of pineapple motifs as carved decorations in woodworking.

Nutrition

Pineapple, raw Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz) Energy 202 kJ (48 kcal) Carbohydrates 12.63 g Sugars 9.26 g Dietary fiber 1.4 g Fat 0.12 g Protein 0.54 g Thiamine (Vit. B1) 0.079 mg (6%) Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.031 mg (2%) Niacin (Vit. B3) 0.489 mg (3%) Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.205 mg (4%) Vitamin B6 0.110 mg (8%) Folate (Vit. B9) 15 μg (4%) Vitamin C 36.2 mg (60%) Calcium 13 mg (1%) Iron 0.28 mg (2%) Magnesium 12 mg (3%) Phosphorus 8 mg (1%) Potassium 115 mg (2%) Zinc 0.10 mg (1%) Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.

P.S. The word pineapple in English was first recorded in 1398, when it was originally used to describe the reproductive organs of conifer trees (now termed pine cones).

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  1. Leapşa cu cultura…

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